Sermons

  • 2 Samuel 5:1-5, 9-10 Goliath Moments (Hoffacker)

    The artist Forabosco shows us David, not as king, but as shepherd. He has killed Goliath with a slingshot, cut off his head, and carries it on one shoulder. What is most notable is the expression on young David’s face––not triumphant but thoughtful.

  • 2 Samuel 6:1-5, 12b-19 Dancing Before the Lord (Anders)

    When Abinadab was given the privilege of moving the Ark to Jerusalem, he hit on a new idea––an ox cart. He put the Ark on the cart so that the people would not be so burdened. This sounds reasonable, but it was not what God had instructed.

  • 2 Samuel 6:1-5, 12b-19 & Mark 6:14-29 Fools for God (Hoffacker)

    We might not be able to avoid foolishness. But we can choose whether our foolishness will lead us to freedom or a loss of freedom––onward to God or trapped in our small selves. Will our foolishness bring about salvation or irreparable loss?

  • 2 Samuel 7:1-11, 16 The Rebirth of Images (Hoffacker)

    A promise of national security, and a woman pregnant before marriage. These two seem utterly different, unrelated. They appear to come from different worlds. But there is a bridge between them, and it is one we may want to travel.

  • 2 Samuel 7:1-14a A House for You (Anders)

    Today’s passage uses the word “house” seven times. It uses "house" in three ways. First, it means “palace.” Second, it means “temple.” Finally, it means “dynasty,” when God speaks of the “house” that God will build for David.

  • 2 Samuel 7:1-14 I Will Build You a House (Hoffacker)

    No enemies threaten David. Life is going well. One afternoon over cocktails, he talks with Nathan the prophet. David has a great place to live––a palace. God has nothing comparable. David decides to build God a temple.

  • 2 Samuel 11:1 – 12:13 David and Bathsheba (Leininger)

    David could have been a gentleman and turned away. But boys will be boys, even boys in high places. “Let’s check this out! Who might this lovely be?” The answer comes back: this is Bathsheba daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite.

  • 2 Samuel 11:1-15 Tragic Flaw (Anders)

    For several months, I have been doing battle with a pesky spider. The image of a spider’s web is appropriate for this sermon on David’s famous sin. For David, one sin led to a web of deceit and sin, and it created a web of impact that lasted for generations.

  • 2 Samuel 11:26-12:13a Someone Like Nathan in Your Life (Hoffacker)

    David denies nothing. He says to Nathan, “I have sinned before the Lord.” A conniving sinner, David becomes an honest penitent. Nathan is the midwife at the second birth of this king. It can be helpful to have someone like Nathan in your life.

  • 2 Samuel 11:26 – 12:13 One Defining Moment (Anders)

    King David had one defining moment. Today I want to ask, “What exactly was his defining moment?” For many people, the defining moment was his act of adultery. For those who study the passage more carefully, his defining moment was his repentance.

  • 2 Samuel 11:26-12:13a Someone Like Nathan in Your Life (Hoffacker)

    David denies nothing. He says to Nathan, “I have sinned before the Lord.” A conniving sinner, David becomes an honest penitent. Nathan is the midwife at the second birth of this king. It can be helpful to have someone like Nathan in your life.

  • 2 Samuel 11:26 – 12:13 One Defining Moment (Anders)

    King David had one defining moment. Today I want to ask, “What exactly was his defining moment?” For many people, the defining moment was his act of adultery. For those who study the passage more carefully, his defining moment was his repentance.

  • 2 Samuel 12:13 Divine Service (Gerhardy)

    How is it that someone so good, someone who claimed to love God, became so bad. Some would label David a hypocrite – and they would be right. And God wasn’t happy with what David had done. Neither is God happy with our sins.

  • 2 Samuel 18.5-9, 15, 31-33 Enough to Raise the Dead (Hoffacker)

    If David, a sinful human like us, laments loudly the killing of his rebel son, then the death of Jesus, who obeys the will of God, brings grief past imagining to the heart of his father. The Father accepts this grief even as the Son accepts his death. They do so freely. Love is the motive.

  • 2 Samuel 18:5-9, 15, 31-33 Caught (Anders)

    David’s son, Amnon, became infatuated with his half-sister Tamar. He tricked her and then raped her. In spite of this terrible crime, David was unable to bring himself to punish his oldest son–– “because he loved him”––classic enabling behavior.

  • 2 Samuel 18:33 Family Problems (Gerhardy)

    A man and his wife were arguing. “It’s just not right”, the wife said. “You don’t like anybody in my family!” “That’s not true,” replied the husband. “I like your mother-in-law much better than my mother-in-law.”