Philippians Sermons2018-06-01T12:23:35+00:00

Sermons

  • Philippians 1:1-11 Thank God for You All (Donovan)

    "I thank my God whenever I remember you." When I was considering this first sermon at this church, that verse came to my mind. "I thank my God whenever I remember you." It described how Paul felt about the Philippians, and it describes how I feel about you.

  • Philippians 1:3-11 Encouragement (Kegel)

    Some years ago a man committed suicide at his place of employment. He left a note to his boss. It read: "I have worked for you for more than thirty years, and in all those years, you never once told me anything I did good. You only told me what I did wrong."

  • Philippians 1:3-11 Upon Every Remembrance (Bowen)

    A cartoon shows a caricature of a well known painting of Adam and Eve fleeing from the garden driven by an overarching angel with a flaming sword in his hand, gates closing behind them. Adam is saying, "Eve, we are living in a time of transition." But transitions can be good and growing moments, a time when we learn and move on.

  • Philippians 1:21-30 Why Am I Here? (Kegel)

    We struggle. We do not have all the answers. Like St. Paul, we need to acknowledge our own struggles. We are not called to know everything or be everything. It is enough to be who we are, the special child God created us to be. It is enough to believe and follow the Lord Jesus and to allow ourselves to be used to glorify God.

  • Philippians 1:21-30 A Worthy Life (Strayhorn)

    The exciting thing about this little church was the fact that they truly fit the description of this passage. They STOOD FIRM IN ONE SPIRIT; THEY STROVE SIDE BY SIDE; THEY HAD ONE MIND AND THEY WERE IN NO WAY BE INTIMIDATED BY OPPONENTS. They knew who they were and whose they were.

  • Philippians 1:21-30 Living and Dying in Christ (McLarty)

    I'll never forget a Presbytery meeting years ago. It included the examination of a candidate to become a Minister of Word and Sacrament. I knew the candidate to be a man of God with a heart for the Lord and a clear sense of God's claim on his life. I also knew he wasn't especially quick on his feet.

  • Philippians 2:1-11 This Humble God (Bowen)

    This gift helped to change Moltman's life. It didn't cure his cold, nor did it free him from incarceration. But this gift came from one who knew what it meant to be without the essentials of life. It was an act of grace and she had given it to a hated German prisoner. She became Christ for this young man and helped heal his loneliness, despair, and suffering.

  • Philippians 2:5-11 What Would Jesus Ride? (Anders)

    What would Jesus drive? If Jesus were on earth today, what kind of vehicle would he choose? Can you imagine Jesus tooling around town in Volkswagen Beetle or do you see him driving a Hummer? What would Jesus drive? I recently found two very different answers to this question.

  • Philippians 2:1-13 Sweat Equity (Hyde)

    Paul knew being church is hard work, and he never minced words about it. Listen to his sales pitch, what he tells the folk in the church at Philippi. "Be of the same mind." You think that's easy? Paul doesn't mean they have to agree all the time. He means that no matter what decisions the congregation makes, they will all support it. Do you know how hard that is?

  • Philippians 2:1-13 Learning to Laugh at Death (Hoffacker)

    On this day and in this gathering two birthdays coincide. The first is the birthday of this congregation. Some of you were here when this congregation was born. The second birthday is the Holy Baptism we celebrate today as Griffin David McIsaac is brought to the waters of salvation.

  • Philippians 2:1-13 Sharing the Mind of Christ (McLarty)

    Truth to tell, the Philippians had a problem. They were divided along many lines--all of which all had one thing in common: Self-interest. One wanted this, another wanted that, and another wanted something altogether different. Paul knew they'd never reach their potential as the Body of Christ until they overcame their divisions.

  • Philippians 3:4-13 Rejoicing in the Midst of Tough Times (Cooper)

    Didn't most of us know all along that neither Wall Street nor WalMart could ever hold the secret to real contentment! So now it's the perfect time to look to Jesus Christ as our source of strength and we'll find our life secured in the blessing of peace and contentment that only Christ can bring.

  • Philippians 3:4b-14 The Subtext of Our Lives (Hoffacker)

    Paul insists on the whole package. He not only wants to know Christ and the power of Christ's resurrection, but he wants to share in the crucifixion as well. The two aspects are as one to him. Neither can exist alone. Paul wants a cruciform life. Not simply life by itself, not simply a cruciform death, but a cruciform life.

  • Philippians 3:4-14 The Prize (Kegel)

    What sets us apart from the busy people all around us is that we have a goal to our race. It is to receive a prize that will make whatever we suffer and lose so much refuse compared to the glory that is ours in Christ. We press on toward the goal of the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus, to eternal life in his name. Amen.

  • Philippians 3:13b-14 Faster! Higher! Stronger! (Leininger)

    You and I may never get to be world-class athletes, but we CAN be world-class Christians. Listen to advice that comes from the Sports Psychologists and then baptize it - put it to work in the name of Jesus. First, SET GOALS. Second, FOCUS. Third, use a little STRESS. Finally, visualize yourself WINNING.

  • Philippians 3:4-9; 4:1-9, 11b-13 Rejoicing in the Midst of Tough Times (Cooper)

    Didn't most of us know all along that neither Wall Street nor WalMart could ever hold the secret to real contentment! So now it's the perfect time to look to Jesus Christ as our source of strength and we'll find our life secured in the blessing of peace and contentment that only Christ can bring. Now, as always, it's time to rejoice in the Lord!

  • Philippians 3:17 – 4:1 Doppelganger Week (Anders)

    Paul acknowledges that we are creatures of conformity. He is saying, "You're going to copy. You're going to mimic someone's steps and mirror someone's movements. That's how we are as human beings. So if you're going to imitate somebody, go ahead and imitate me. Follow me as I follow Jesus."

  • Philippians 3:4-9; 4:1-9, 11b-13 Rejoicing in the Midst of Tough Times (Cooper)

    Didn't most of us know all along that neither Wall Street nor WalMart could ever hold the secret to real contentment! So now it's the perfect time to look to Jesus Christ as our source of strength and we'll find our life secured in the blessing of peace and contentment that only Christ can bring. Now, as always, it's time to rejoice in the Lord!

  • Philippians 3:17 – 4:1 Doppelganger Week (Anders)

    Paul acknowledges that we are creatures of conformity. He is saying, "You're going to copy. You're going to mimic someone's steps and mirror someone's movements. That's how we are as human beings. So if you're going to imitate somebody, go ahead and imitate me. Follow me as I follow Jesus."

  • Philippians 4:1-9 Four Part Harmony (Molin)

    Paul offers a four-step equation to face adversity. A four-part harmony, just like a guitar chord, where each step Paul proposes is dependent upon the other three steps. You can't just do one; you need all four. 1. Do not worry about anything. 2. Pray about everything. 3. Be thankful. 4. We can have peace.

  • Philippians 4:4-7 The Peace of Prayer (Bowen)

    The Apostle Paul says, "In nothing be anxious, but in everything, by prayer and petition with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God." This is not a bromide. Paul does not stop there. He offers as the antidote to anxiety, what? "In nothing be anxious... pray." The discipline of prayer, he insists, is the answer to worry, the way to clarity of mind and heart.

  • Philippians 4:4-7 The Faith of Gratitude (Bowen)

    Paul writes, "do not be anxious, but make your needs known... with thanksgiving." So does gratitude save us, grant us inner peace and stability, joy and sense of purpose because it is one human emotion in which we are clearly called out of ourselves, caught up with God and life. Gratitude does it. But how to get it.

  • Philippians 4:4-8 The Springs of Gratitude (Bowen)

    Paul does NOT say, "Finally beloved, whatever is tragic, whatever is scandalous, whatever is gruesome, whatever is criminal, whatever is threatening, whatever is despicable, whatever is lascivious, whatever is ugly, whatever is degrading, fill your thoughts with all these things."